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AAAS elects four LANL scientists as Fellows

The American Association for the Advancement of Science has selected Jennifer Martinez, Mary Neu, Basil Swanson and William Woodruff to be AAAS Fellows.
December 19, 2012
Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

These individuals have been elevated to this rank because of their efforts toward advancing science applications that are deemed scientifically or socially distinguished.

The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) has selected Jennifer Martinez, Mary Neu, Basil Swanson and William Woodruff to be AAAS Fellows. Election to Fellow is an honor bestowed upon AAAS members by their peers. These individuals have been elevated to this rank because of their efforts toward advancing science applications that are deemed scientifically or socially distinguished. New Fellows will be honored with an official certificate and a rosette pin on Feb. 16, during the 2013 AAAS Annual Meeting in Boston.

Jennifer Martinez

Jennifer Martinez of Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (MPA-CINT) was honored “For imaginative and insightful contributions to the field of soft, biological and composite nanomaterials.” Martinez holds a doctorate in bioinorganic chemistry from the University of California, Santa Barbara. She came to Los Alamos in 2002 as a Directors Postdoctoral Fellow and later became a staff member. She uses biological methods to create functional materials. Her research has significant potential medical applications for the development of fluorescent nanoclusters for better cancer detection and biological imaging techniques. In addition, her work advances the development of optical and bio-polymer libraries for highly biocompatible materials. Martinez holds six patents. She has received a Presidential Early Career Award for Science and Engineering, a R&D 100 Award for NanoCluster Beacons and two LANL Outstanding Mentoring Awards.

Mary Neu

Mary Neu of Weapons Program (PADWP) was cited “For distinguished contributions to actinide science, especially biogeochemistry and coordination chemistry, and for leadership at the highest levels in chemical and environmental sciences in the national interest.” Neu received a doctorate in inorganic and nuclear chemistry from the University of California, Berkeley. She came to LANL as a University of California President’s Postdoctoral Fellow and became a staff member in 1995. Neu is internationally recognized for her pioneering work in actinide aqueous, bioinorganic, and biogeochemistry. She and her collaborators established new methods to characterize pure compounds and actinides in complex media. Neu led research that characterized radionuclide interactions with environmental microbes and minerals. She has served as treasurer for the American Chemical Society’s Division of Inorganic Chemistry, an associate Laboratory director at LANL, and chief scientist for the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management.

Basil Swanson

Basil Swanson of Biosecurity and Public Health (B-10) was recognized “For distinguished contributions to the field of physical inorganic chemistry and chemical science leadership at Los Alamos National Laboratory.” He received a doctorate in inorganic chemistry from Northwestern University. Following a postdoc at Los Alamos in 1970 -1971, Swanson held faculty positions prior to returning to LANL as a staff member in 1980. Swanson has served as the group leader of five different groups in chemistry and bioscience and as the deputy division leader for Chemistry and Bioscience divisions. He has worked at the interface of the physical and biological sciences with an emphasis on molecular recognition, sensors inspired by nature, and new approaches for the diagnosis of cancer and infectious disease. Swanson has authored over 260 articles in peer-reviewed journals. He holds numerous patents in advanced materials and sensors, and he is a Laboratory Fellow at Los Alamos.

William Woodruff

William Woodruff (retired Laboratory Fellow) was cited “For distinguished contributions to time-resolved spectroscopy with applications in inorganic chemistry, bioenergetics, photochemistry and photobiology, and molecular energy transduction.” He received a doctorate in analytical and inorganic chemistry from Purdue University. Woodruff held faculty positions prior to joining LANL as a staff member in 1984. His research includes the kinetics and dynamics of molecules in solution, laser spectroscopic probes of chemical reactions, biophysics, photophysics, and photochemistry; bioenergetics and molecular energy transduction; and scaling relationships. Woodruff is currently an adjunct professor at the University of New Mexico and external professor at The Santa Fe Institute. While at Los Alamos he received a R&D 100 Award, the Coblentz Society’s Bomem-Michelson Award and the Biophysical Society’s Founders’ Award, and he was elected a Laboratory Fellow. He has served on the Executive Committee of the Inorganic Division and as chair of the Bioinorganic Subdivision of the American Chemical Society.

About the American Association for the Advancement of Science

The AAAS is the world’s largest general scientific society and publisher of the journals Science, Science Translational Medicine and Science Signaling. Founded in 1848, AAAS includes 261 affiliated societies and academies of science, serving 10 million individuals. The nonprofit AAAS has a mission to “advance science and serve society” through initiatives in science policy, international programs, science education, and more. The tradition of AAAS Fellows began in 1874.


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