Los Alamos National Labs with logo 2021

Threatened and Endangered Species at LANL

The Threatened and Endangered Species Habitat Management Plan for Los Alamos National Laboratory provides a management strategy for compliance with the Endangered Species Act.
February 2, 2015
Adult Mexican Spotted Owl

Adult Mexican Spotted Owl recorded in 2010.

Contact  

  • Environmental Communication & Public Involvement
  • P.O. Box 1663 MS K491
  • Los Alamos, NM 87545
  • (505) 667-3792
  • Email
The Habitat Management Plan details how threatened and endangered species and their habitats are managed at LANL.

The Threatened and Endangered Species Habitat Management Plan for Los Alamos National Laboratory provides a management strategy for compliance with the Endangered Species Act. It details how threatened and endangered species and their habitats are managed at LANL and contains site plans for federally listed threatened or endangered species with a moderate or high probability of occurring on LANL property.

The following federally listed threatened or endangered species currently have site plans at LANL:

  • Jemez Mountains Salamander (Plethodon neomexicanus)
  • Mexican Spotted Owl (Strix occidentalis lucida)
  • Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax trailii extimus)
Learn more about the Jemez Mountains Salamander
 Jemez Mountains Salamander

The Jemez Mountains salamander was listed as “endangered” under the Endangered Species Act in 2013. It is endemic to the Jemez Mountains. This strictly terrestrial, lungless salamander inhabits high elevation, moist, mixed conifer forests with high canopy cover.

At LANL, there are nine areas of environmental interest identified as Jemez Mountains salamander habitat.

The primary threats to the Jemez Mountains salamander on LANL property are habitat loss and degradation from wildland fires, development, and recreational impacts. Another potential threat is the spread of fungal disease from other geographically widespread amphibians.

Learn more about the Mexican Spotted Owl
Mexican Spotted Owl

The Mexican spotted owl was listed as “threatened” under the Endangered Species Act in 1993. It is the only subspecies of spotted owl recognized in New Mexico and generally inhabits mixed conifer and ponderosa pine forests in mountains and canyons. A mated pair of adult spotted owls may use general nesting areas throughout their greater than 15-year lifespan.

At LANL there are five areas of environmental interest identified as Mexican spotted owl habitat.

The primary threats to Mexican spotted owl on LANL property are impacts to habitat quality from LANL operations, undeveloped habitat conversion, and noise disturbance during the breeding season.

Learn more about the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher
Southwestern Willow Flycatcher

The Southwestern Willow Flycatcher was listed as “endangered” under the Endangered Species Act in 1995. The species breeds only in dense riparian habitats in the southwestern United States. In New Mexico, it is found primarily along the Gila River and Rio Grande. It is vulnerable to the loss, fragmentation, and modification of riparian breeding habitat, including the removal of exotic vegetation along the Rio Grande, where nesting in salt cedar is a regular occurrence.

At LANL, there is one area of environmental interest managed as Southwestern Willow Flycatcher habitat under the Habitat Management Plan.