Los Alamos National Labs with logo 2021

Applications open for the 2021 Summer Physics Camp for Young Women

Free camp offers a unique opportunity to explore STEM careers
March 3, 2021
Last year’s Summer Physics Camp for Young Women gathered students from across New Mexico and further afield.

Last year’s Summer Physics Camp for Young Women gathered students from across New Mexico and further afield.

Contacts  

  • Director, Community Partnerships Office
  • Kathy Keith
  • Email

Applications open for the 2021 Summer Physics Camp for Young Women

Applications are now being accepted for the 5th edition of the Summer Physics Camp for Young Women in Northern New Mexico, which offers a unique opportunity to explore what careers in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) are all about.

Held virtually this year from June 7-19 and organized by the Laboratory and its partners, the free camp will focus on boosting students' understanding of how STEM allows us to accomplish what was unimaginable just a few years ago: including exploring Mars, deciphering the origins of the universe during the Big Bang, understanding COVID-19 behavior and vaccines, and programming and building robots.

The camp is open to young women attending Northern New Mexico schools who have completed Algebra I or higher-level math courses. Acceptance is not based on grades or GPA. The application deadline is Friday April 2, 2021, and students can learn more and apply here.

Virtual event explores COVID-19

On Feb. 24, Laboratory researchers brought a virtual audience to the front lines of the battle against COVID-19 with their Frontiers in Science event, “Coexisting with COVID-19 and the role of science.” The moderated conversation featured computational evolutionary biologist Will Fischer (T-6), applied mathematician Nick Hengartner (T-6) and biological physicist Judy Mourant (B-11), and included questions from the more than 400 online attendees.

The scientists discussed what they’ve learned about the coronavirus down to the genomic level, and what the scientific outlook is for the future of humanity’s relationship with the virus post-inoculation. They also explored how we forecast the number of new infections and use that to help inform policymakers. A recording of the fascinating event is available here.

 mukundan-harshini.jpg

Laboratory researcher featured in article on the importance of science fairs

Laboratory microbiologist Harshini Mukundan underlines the importance of school science fairs in a recent article for the U.S. Department of State website ShareAmerica. Mukundan outlines how science fairs help students apply what they’ve learned in STEM subjects in an innovative way. “Every individual child decides to take and pick what they’re interested in and explores it however they want,” she says. “Scientific curiosity starts young, and I think it really needs to be nourished and encouraged. Science is an art, it involves a lot of creativity. It involves a lot of imagination, and innovation and ingenuity and new ideas.” The full article is here.