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Fellows' Prize for Research

Demonstrating outstanding research in science or engineering.

Fellows' Prize for Research Recipients

Citations used where available

2014

Patrick Chain of Bioenergy and Biome Sciences (B-11) provides a high level of performance, broad scientist achievement and leadership in bioinformatics and genomic sciences. He has worked with the Naval Medical Research Center to develop the Empowering the Development of Geonomic Expertise (EDGE), which has raised the Laboratory's prominence in genomics to a new level. Chain has published more than 135 articles that have been cited more than 9,200 times.

Piotr Zelenay of Materials Synthesis and Integrated Devices (MPA-11) is world-recognized in the area of inexpensive, nonprecious metal electrocatalysts intended to replace platinum in polymer fuel cells. Zelenay led the use of nonprecious transition metal catalysts in a composite form, taking advantage of the latest developments in nanostructured materials engineering.

2013

Jennifer Hollingsworth has made remarkable accomplishments in defining, shaping and leading the field of core/shell semiconductor nanocrystalline quantum dots (NQDs), nanomaterials with unique optical emission properties and enormous technological ramifications in next-generation lighting and biological imaging applications.  Hollingsworth’s breakthrough discovery of “giant” NQDs removed the nanomaterial’s problematic photophysical phenomenon of “blinking” and provided an exciting test bed for advancing the understanding of semiconductor physics in the quantum confinement regime. Her NQD research alone—published in series of 50 papers since 2000 and cited by other researchers more than 3,500 times—has had a significant international impact on the synthesis and elucidation of the underlying photophysical properties of nanocrystalline quantum dots through her discovery of giant NQDs.

As team leader at LANL’s Center for Materials at Irradiation and Mechanical Extremes (CMIME), Blas Uberuaga has led the work on defect recovery at interfaces. Uberuaga has had three outstanding scientific achievements over the past 10 years: accelerated molecular dynamics method development, amorphization resistance of complex oxides, and the discovery of a new mechanism for point defect recovery at interfaces.  Uberuaga’s work played a significant role in establishing CMIME’s unique contribution to the field of radiation damage. Since 1999, Uberuaga has published 123 papers, which have been cited 3,323 times, putting him at the very top amongst his peers at his seniority level in the field of structural materials.

2012

Cristian Batista

Cristian Batista is a theoretical condensed matter physicist who has made seminal contributions to the understanding of quantum magnetism. Batista has pioneered the discovery and explanation of remarkable, often counterintuitive, quantum states of matter.  In addition to making foundational analytical and numerical contributions to basic theory, a hallmark of Batista’s theoretical work is his close involvement with experimentalists, with more than half of his publications in the last eight years being written jointly with experimental colleagues. The combination of fundamental theoretical insights and phenomenological explanations that he has provided have resulted in significant impact on the field. Batista has published 148 papers, including 46 – fully one third of his publications – in Physical Review Letters, Science, or Nature. These papers have already been cited by other researchers some 1,900 times.

Irene Beyerlein

Irene Beyerlein works at the forefront of several areas of materials science research that are relevant to Los Alamos programs.  She has done significant research on multi-scale modeling for dislocation physics and dynamics, providing insights into how materials yield under stress loading. Her work in the area of nanoscale materials and microstructural evolution during severe plastic deformation has lead to advances in our understanding of this class of materials. She has also made considerable progress in the ability to make macroscale predictions of stress-strain response. This research has lead to many important research publications.  “This year’s prizes again show the depth and breadth of the scientific talent at Los Alamos,” said Laboratory Director Charlie McMillan. “I’m proud that Los Alamos continues to be a home for such creative and innovative work. Congratulations to Fernando, Cristian, Irene, and their collaborators.”

2011

McMillan and the Laboratory’s Fellows organization have awarded the 2011 Fellows Prize for Research to

•   Stephen Doorn of the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies

•   David Jablonski of the XTD Primary Physics

2010

The Fellows Prize for Outstanding Research in Science or Engineering commends individuals for exemplary research performed at the Laboratory within the past 10 years that has had a significant effect on a scientific discipline or program. The Fellows Prize selection committee selected Sergei Tretiak in part for his development of organic light-emitting diodes for flexible displays, organic lasers, light-harvesting energy devices, and other important technologies. Tretiak has published more than 90 papers in the past 10 years in esteemed scientific journals and is often invited as keynote speaker at international scientific conferences.

Geoff Waldo is coauthor of four important articles in Nature Biotechnology, beginning in 1999 as first author of “Rapid Protein Folding Assay using Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP).” GFP has since become one of the most important tools in bioscience, and Waldo’s work has been integral to securing more than $50 million in research grants at the Laboratory.

2009

  • Turab Lookman, T-4
    For his wide-ranging contributions to the understanding of intrinsic inhomogeneity in functional materials

2008

  • Jaqueline L. Kiplinger, MPA-10
    For her remarkable accomplishments in organometallic actinide chemistry
  • Amit Misra, MPA-CINT
    For his long-standing research contributions to the understanding of deformation in materials and particularly for his recent accomplishments in nanomechanics

2007

  • Tom Vestrand, ISR-1
    For his ouststanding research in explosive transients and large-area sky monitoring, contributing to our understanding of gamma-ray bursts
  • Scott Crooker, MPA-NHMFL
    For his outstanding research in the development of novel magneto-optical spectroscopies and their application to problems in solid state and atomic physics systems

2006

  • Cheryl Kuske, B-1
    For her extraordinary impact in the areas of environmental microbiology and biothreat reduction
  • Tim Germann, X-1
    For his research in material physics, specifically shock plasticity and shock-induced phase transitions, as well as his highly innovative work on molecular dynamics simulations of pandemics

2005

  • Neil Harrison, MST-NHMFL
    For his outstanding contributions to condensed matter physics using high magnetic fields to make ground-breaking discoveries in strongly correlated materials
  • Robert Roussel-Dupré, EES-2
    For his outstanding contributions to the understanding of upward propagating lightning discharges, in particular through the universally accepted theory of electron runaway breakdown initiated by cosmic-ray showers

2004

  • Roger Johnston, C-ADI
    For path-breaking work on the problem of the vulnerability of critical facilities and materials to theft or tampering
  • John Sarrao, MST-10
    For outstanding contributions to condensed matter physics of rare earth and transition metal oxides, borides and 4f- and 5f intermetallics, in particular toward an understanding of superconductivity in PuCoGa5 and in Cerium-based 115 compounds

2003

2002

  • Carole Burns, C-DO
    For her outstanding contributions to the understanding of metal-ligand multiple bonding in organometallic chemistry of actinide elements
  • Robert Hixson, DX-2
    For his seminal contributions to the understanding of dynamic properties of plutonium and explosives materials, which have been critical to the success of stockpile stewardship
  • Roman Movshovich, MST-10
    For his outstanding research in experimental low-temperature condensed-matter physics and, in particular, for his research on unconventional superconductivity and correlated-electron physics

2001

  • Joseph Carlson, T-16
    For his critical breakthrough in Quantum Monte Carlo techniques that allowed exact numerical descriptions of many-body nuclei
  • Kurt Sickafus, MST-8
    For his major contributions to the understanding of radiation damage in materials, including a class of complex oxides highly resistent to radiation damage
  • Giday WoldeGabriel, EES-6
    For his profound contributions to the understanding of early hominid evolution in East Africa

2000

  • David Clark, NMT-DO
    For outstanding contributions to the understanding of the molecular behavior and of the solution chemistry of actinide ions
  • Richard Epstein, NIS-2
    For pioneering work in laser cooling of solids and for leading Los Alamos' Solid State Refrigerator (LASSOR) development program
  • Martin Maley, MST-STC
    For outstanding contributions to the understanding of quantized vortices in high-temperature superconductors, including the development of the Maley analysis technique

1999

  • Victor Klimov, CST-6
    For his experimental research and interpretation of the behavior of 'quantum dot' systems

1998

  • Shiyi Chen, CNLS
    For his work on fluid turbulence
  • Paul Kwiat, P-23
    For groundbreaking experiments in quantum mechanics
  • Dave Vieira, CST-11
    For several outstanding achievements in nuclear and atomic science

1997

  • Richard Hughes, P-23
    For his work in quantum information physics

1996

  • R. Brian Dyer, CST-4
    Role of molecular dynamics in protein structure and function
  • George T. (Rusty) Gray III, MST-5
    Structure/property effects of high-rate shock deformations on metals and alloys

1995

  • Michael Nastasi, MST-4
    For work on ion-solid interactions
  • Joe D. Thompson, MST-10
    For work on correlated electron physics
  • Stuart Trugman, T-11
    For work on superconductors and fullerenes

1994

  • Bob Benjamin, DX-13
    For work on fluid interfaces
  • Chris Hammel, MST-10
    For experiments on magnetic and electronic properties of high-temperature superconductors
  • Jill Trewhella, CST-4
    For biophysical measurements of proteins in solution

1993

  • John Petrovic, MST-4
    For studies on high temperature silicides
  • Gregory Swift, MST-10
    For studies on thermoacoustic engines

1992

  • Charlie E. Strauss, CLS-4
    For studies on chemical dynamics

1991

  • Aloysius J. Arko, P-10
    For developing new experimental approaches to determine the electronic structure of materials that exhibit high-temperature superconductivity
  • Robert E. Ecke, P-10
    For precise measurements of Rayleigh-Benard convection in a helium superfluid, which was a major advance in nonlinear dynamics and chaos
  • Robert K. Moyzis, Center of Human Genome
    For research on the organization of chromosomes, specifically, for identification of the human telomeric DNA sequence

1990

  • Ralph Menikoff, T-14
    In recognition of outstanding research contributing to the understanding of fluid flow in real materials and advancing predictive capabilities in numerical hydrodynamics

1989

  • Judith Binstock, X-6
    For outstanding work and major impact in the area of material mix in nuclear weapons
  • J. Doyne Farmer, T-13
    For pioneering work on noise reduction and forecasting. These important applications of chaos to real-world phenomena are one of the premier developments to come from dynamical systems research in recent years.
  • Paul S. Follansbee, MST-5
    For theoretical and experimental work on the rate sensitive behavior of metals especially with regard to the hardening behavior of metals and alloys with large changes in plastic strain rate and the application to DoD armor/anti-armor technology

1988

  • Darryl Smith, MEE-11
    Contribution to the understanding of semiconductor superlattices, particularly for studies of their electronic structures and design implications for a variety of applications
  • Wojciech Zurek, T-6
    Contributions to the understanding of the structure of the universe, especially for clarifying the role of cosmological strings in galaxy formation and distribution

Innovations for a secure nation

Portable MRI aids wounded soldiers, children in remote areas

Portable MRI aids wounded soldiers, children in remote areas

Scientists are developing an ultra-low-field Magnetic Resonance Imaging system that could be low-power and lightweight enough for forward deployment on the battlefield and to field hospitals in the World's poorest regions.  

» All Innovations

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