Los Alamos National Laboratory

Los Alamos National Laboratory

Delivering science and technology to protect our nation and promote world stability

Awards, Achievements

Discoveries and innovations by our workforce, lauded worldwide
  • Fellow of Optical Society

    Fellow of Optical Society

    The board of directors of The Optical Society (OSA) has elected Hou-Tong Chen (Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, MPA-CINT) as an OSA Fellow.

  • American Physical Society Fellow

    American Physical Society Fellow

    Christopher J. Fontes (Materials and Physical Data, XCP-5) was cited “For pioneering contributions to our understanding of atomic processes in plasmas and their application to a broad range of physics problems including nuclear fusion, laboratory experiment and astrophysics.”

  • American Physical Society Fellow

    American Physical Society Fellow

    Han Htoon (Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, MPA-CINT) was cited “For pioneering accomplishments in development of single nanostructure, optical spectroscopy/imaging techniques, elucidating fundamental/quantum optical processes of quantum dots and single wall carbon nanotubes, and device integration of optical nanomaterials.

  • American Physical Society Fellow

    American Physical Society Fellow

    Toshihiko Kawano (Nuclear and Particle Physics, Astrophysics and Cosmology, T-2) was cited “For significant contributions to the development of nuclear reaction theories in low-energy physics, their implementation in widely used nuclear reaction codes and their application to the production of evaluated nuclear data for neutron transport simulations for basic and applied science.”

  • American Physical Society Fellow

    American Physical Society Fellow

    John W. Lewellen (Accelerators and Electrodynamics, AOT-AE) was cited “For leadership and contributions to the development of practical, high-power superconducting RF photocathode guns, including the development of novel RF cavity designs.”

  • American Physical Society Fellow

    American Physical Society Fellow

    Laura Beth Smilowitz (Physical Chemistry and Applied Spectroscopy, C-PCS) was cited “For pioneering radiography to study thermal explosions, including the development of both a scaled tabletop dynamic radiographic facility capable of producing continuous X-ray movies of high-speed events and the triggering techniques required to observe the spontaneous onset of a thermal explosion.”

  • American Physical Society Fellow

    American Physical Society Fellow

    Stuart A. Trugman (Physics of Condensed Matter and Complex Systems, T-4) was cited “For outstanding and original contributions to polaron physics, quantum Hall effect, far from equilibrium phenomena, disorder and superconductivity.” The APS Division of Condensed Matter Physics nominated him.

  • American Physical Society Fellow

    American Physical Society Fellow

    Vivien Zapf (National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, MPA-MAG) was cited “For seminal contributions to the understanding of quantum mechanical properties of superconductors, quantum magnets and multiferroic systems at low temperatures and in extreme magnetic fields to 100T.”

  • Entrepreneurial Fellows

    Entrepreneurial Fellows

    Vamshi Chillara (Materials Synthesis and Integrated Devices, MPA-11) is developing a technology that would power implants using ultrasound, thus providing wireless energy delivery for biomedical applications.

  • Entrepreneurial Fellows

    Entrepreneurial Fellows

    Jessica Kubicek-Sutherland (Physical Chemistry and Applied Spectroscopy, C-PCS) is developing a universal bacterial biosensor that will allow for the rapid differentiation of bacterial pathogens in a patient’s bloodstream to quickly determine the appropriate treatment.

  • Entrepreneurial Fellows

    Entrepreneurial Fellows

    Anand Kumar (Biosecurity and Public Health, B-10) is developing a universal gut microbial cocktail to treat Clostridioides difficile (C-diff), a severe intestinal infection in humans.

  • Entrepreneurial Fellows

    Entrepreneurial Fellows

    Maruti Mudunuru (Computational Earth Science, EES-16) is developing a low-cost, energy-efficient, and near real-time means to monitor the Earth and environmental processes.

Discoveries, developments, advancements, and inventions pouring from Los Alamos make America—and the world—a better and safer place

It was here, for instance, that the Human Genome Project—and other crucial efforts that many people don’t associate with Los Alamos National Laboratory—began.

Many measures of progress distinguish the people of Los Alamos and their work: awards, prizes, patents, and publication in leading journals of both original material and citations.

The science and technology that attracts collaborators, earns accolades, and commands attention in prestigious journals varies tremendously

For example:

  • Los Alamos is home to the world’s most powerful x-ray machine, a tool essential to maintain the nation’s stockpile of nuclear weapons without returning to underground testing.
  • In March 2012, a Los Alamos team broke its own world record for strongest nondestructive magnet, surging past the elusive 100-tesla mark and clearing the way for a host of new endeavors, including a new type of superconductor.
  • A supercomputer at Los Alamos was the world’s first to break the petaflop barrier (a million billion operations per second), dramatically increasing the speed and fidelity of simulations to model everything from nuclear weapons implosions and the origin of our universe to mapping the evolutionary tree of the AIDS virus and how nanowires work.

Such extremes are dramatic in themselves.

But they’re only a means to an end: performing breakthrough experiments that advance the state of science—as well as state of the art—all to bolster national security.