Los Alamos National Laboratory

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Faces of Science: Tom Vestrand

Tom Vestrand has always been interested in how the universe began, how it will end, and the nature of its early, violent history. At Los Alamos, he has worked on developing fully autonomous “thinking telescopes” that catch gamma-ray bursts—the biggest explosions since the Big Bang.
March 4, 2015
Tom Vestrand

Tom Vestrand, Space Physics

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SPACE PHYSICS

Robotic telescopes, distributed sensor networks, and machine learning: imagining our future

As a child, Tom Vestrand watched Frank Capra’s The Strange Case of Cosmic Rays. The educational film presented students a challenge to become the next generation of scientists to solve the unanswered mysteries about the nature of the universe.

Faces of Science: Tom Vestrand
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Faces of Science: Tom Vestrand

Tom took up the challenge, and at Los Alamos has worked on developing and integrating new technologies, such as robotic telescopes, distributed sensor networks, and machine learning.

His work on “thinking telescopes” has helped collect information about gamma-ray bursts, which carry unique information about the nature of the early universe.


Vestrand works for ISR-2's Space & Remote Sensing group.


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