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Los Alamos National Laboratory

Los Alamos National Laboratory

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Faces of Science: Michelle Espy

While taking physics in high school, Michelle Espy realized that scientific methods could be used to predict and understand things. Michelle has applied this knowledge to develop sensitive magnetic sensors that measure brain function and detect liquid bombs.
March 4, 2015
Michelle Espy

While taking physics in high school, Michelle Espy realized that scientific methods could be used to predict and understand things. Michelle has applied this knowledge to develop sensitive magnetic sensors that measure brain function and detect liquid bombs.

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PHYSICS

Espy spies on radioactive substances to protect nation

While taking physics in high school, Michelle Espy realized that the world wasn’t just random—she could use scientific methods to predict and understand things.

At Los Alamos, Michelle and her team have developed SQUIDs (Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices) to measure brain function, image brain features, and detect liquid bombs.

Such work has verified Michelle’s realization years ago that the world is not random, as diverse applications for SQUIDs actually share many underlying principles.

Read more:
Better than X-Ray: MagViz probes chemicals faster for less »



Espy works for P-21's Applied Modern Physics group.


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