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Los Alamos National Laboratory Research Quarterly, Winter 2003
Proton Radiography
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Proton-radiography beam line

Before entering the three magnetic lenses that form the radiographic images, the proton beam passes through a thin tantalum sheet, which spreads the beam so it can illuminate the entire test object. The beam then passes through a set of quadrupole electromagnets that give the protons the angle-position correlation required for sharp imaging. These electromagnets also focus the protons to a plane called image plane 0, where small fiducial markers are placed. The markers appear on all the downstream images and are used to align the imaging apparatus. Each of the three proton lenses consists of four quadrupole electromagnets, with a collimator at the midplane of each lens. Lens 1 focuses image plane 0 onto the object plane, where the test object is placed (usually inside a confinement vessel). Lens 2 focuses the object plane onto image plane 1, where digital cameras record radiographic images of the object produced on a scintillator in the proton beam's path. Lens 3 focuses image plane 1 (and its replica of the object plane's image) onto image plane 2, where a second scintillator plate captures a second set of radiographs. The two sets of radiographs can be taken at different magnifications or compared at the same magnification to determine the test object's composition.

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