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Los Alamos National Laboratory Research Quarterly, Fall 2002
RAPTOR Science
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First Gammy Ray Movie

RAPTOR captured its first transient optical event on December 11, 2002. The upper photo shows the light emitted by a gamma-ray burst 64.9 seconds after a satellite detected the burst. In the lower photo, taken 9 minutes after the burst was detected, the object is nearly invisible. These images were taken by RAPTOR-B. (RAPTOR-A was not yet operational.) They proved that even a gamma-ray burst with weak gamma-ray emission (as measured by the satellite that detected the burst) can generate a bright burst of light.

RAPTOR captured its first transient optical event on December 11, 2002. The upper photo shows the light emitted by a gamma-ray burst 64.9 seconds after a satellite detected the burst. In the lower photo, taken 9 minutes after the burst was detected, the object is nearly invisible. These images were taken by RAPTOR-B. (RAPTOR-A was not yet operational.) They proved that even a gamma-ray burst with weak gamma-ray emission (as measured by the satellite that detected the burst) can generate a bright burst of light.

 

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