How much radiation is too much?

Federal government standards limit the dose that the public may receive from Laboratory operations.
August 1, 2013
For an individual living near LANL in 2012, the average radiation exposure from all sources was estimated at approximately 751 mrem. One-tenth of one percent can be attributed to LANL sources.

For an individual living near LANL in 2012, the average radiation exposure from all sources was estimated at approximately 751 mrem. One-tenth of one percent can be attributed to LANL sources.

Dose is an estimate of the level of risk from exposure to radiation.

What is dose?

Dose is an estimate of the level of risk from exposure to radiation. Every year LANL calculates the potential emission dose historical and current operations may contribute to the public.

LANL reports the data on air emissions and public exposure through the Intellus database.

DOE Order 458.1 establishes requirements to protect the public and the environment against undue risk from radiation associated with radiological activities conducted by LANL. That limit is 10 millirem per year. By comparison, an airplane flight at 36,000 feet yields a rate of about 0.2 to 0.8 millirem per hour. Chest x-rays range from 4 to 15 millirem, and a bone scan is about 440 millirem.

  • Radiation Dose
    • Amount of energy per gram of living tissue a person receives from a radioactive source
    • Measured in millirem (mrem)
    • The primary risk of radiation dose is cancer. For low doses of radiation, the risk of cancer is estimated to be 8 additional cases per 10,000,000 people per millirem received.
  • Chemicals Dose
    • A measure of the amount of a chemical per gram of living tissue
Visit Blogger Join Us on Facebook Follow Us on Twitter See our Flickr Photos Watch Our YouTube Videos Find Us on LinkedIn Find Us on iTunes