Physics Division

Inertial confinement and high density
plasma physics

Using the world’s most powerful lasers, Physics Division scientists are aiming to create thermonuclear burn in the laboratory.

The experimental research of the Physics Division’s Inertial Confinement Fusion program is conducted at the National Ignition Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the OMEGA Laser Facility at the University of Rochester, and the Trident Laser Facility at Los Alamos.

Within inertial confinement fusion and the high energy density area, Los Alamos specializes in hohlraum energetics, symmetry tuning, warm dense matter physics, and hydrodynamics in ultra-extreme conditions. When complete, this research will enable the exploitation of fusion as an energy resource and will enable advanced research in stockpile stewardship science.

Our staff is interested in the development, engineering, fabrication, commissioning, operation, and interpretation of advanced x-ray, gamma-ray, and neutron diagnostics. Physics Division designed and constructed the very fast x-ray framing cameras used at the National Ignition Facility (NIF), the Gamma Reaction History instrument at the NIF that measures the time of peak deuterium and tritium reactivity, and the neutron imaging system that records the spatial details of the burning plasma inside a NIF-imploded capsule.

Our research requires close collaboration with computational physicists in X-Theoretical Design and X-Computational Physics Divisions, as well as target fabrication specialists in Materials Science and Technology Division.

 

The neutron imaging camera and recording components are now installed at the NIF and have taken their first calibration data. The neutron imaging camera and recording components are now installed at the National Ignition Facility and have taken their first calibration data.
The neutron imaging camera and recording components are now installed at the NIF and have taken their first calibration data.

 

 

The four-channel GRH-6m is attached to the NIF target chamber.  An optimized optical design and fast electrical signal transmission yields bangtime precision to better than 30 ps.

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