Los Alamos National Laboratory

Los Alamos National Laboratory

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Science in 60 - Searching for dark matter

Nearly 14,000 feet up the slopes of Mexico's Sierra Negra volcano, a unique observatory called HAWC is providing insight into some of the most violent phenomena in the known universe.
September 30, 2016
Nearly 14,000 feet up the slopes of Mexico's Sierra Negra volcano, a unique observatory called HAWC is providing insight into some of the most violent phenomena in the known universe.

Nearly 14,000 feet up the slopes of Mexico's Sierra Negra volcano, a unique observatory called HAWC is providing insight into some of the most violent phenomena in the known universe.

Nearly 14,000 feet up the slopes of Mexico's Sierra Negra volcano, a unique observatory called HAWC (High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Gamma Ray Observatory) is providing insight into some of the most violent phenomena in the known universe, such as supernovae explosions and the evolution of supermassive black holes. For Dr. Andrea Albert, the Marie Curie Distinguished Postdoctoral Fellow at Los Alamos National Lab, HAWC provides another distinct opportunity: a way to search for signals from dark matter.


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