Los Alamos National Laboratory

Los Alamos National Laboratory

Delivering science and technology to protect our nation and promote world stability

Science on the Hill

Columns in the Santa Fe New Mexican written by Los Alamos scientists

All Science on the Hill

  • If these (Martian) rocks could talk

    If these (Martian) rocks could talk

    Finding the element boron might not seem exciting, but if you find it on Mars and you’re interested in alien life, it’s a big deal. - 4/9/17

  • What cosmology tells us about quantum mechanics

    Protecting grid from cataclysmic solar storm

    Los Alamos has been studying space weather for more than 50 years as part of its national security mission to monitor nuclear testing around the globe, and part of that work includes studying how the radiation-saturated environment of near space can affect technology and people. - 2/12/17

  • What cosmology tells us about quantum mechanics

    What cosmology tells us about quantum mechanics

    Early universe research at Los Alamos exploits cosmological physics to gain insight into the physics of nuclei here on Earth. Accurately knowing the nuclear reaction rates of hydrogen, helium, and lithium is important for a variety of applications central to the Lab’s earthly mission in nuclear safety, basic science, energy and security. - 1/8/17
  • Bringing the power of genetic research to an office near you

    Bringing the power of genetic research to an office near you

    The ability to quickly analyze genetic data stands to revolutionize research into everything from the mutations causing various cancers to the “Second You,” your microbiome, or the bacteria living inside you. - 12/16/16
  • Bringing the power of genetic research to an office near you

    Fires set to clear African land are stoking climate change

    The ability to quickly analyze genetic data stands to revolutionize research into everything from the mutations causing various cancers to the “Second You,” your microbiome, or the bacteria living inside you. - 11/13/16
  • This 3D image taken at Los Alamos National Laboratory by x-ray tomography shows an experimental fuel cell membrane electrode assembly.

    On track for a clean, hydrogen-powered future

    Los Alamos, within the ElectroCat consortium, is investigating less expensive, more abundant materials based on carbon compounds to reduce the cost of ownership of a fuel-cell powered car so this clean power can compete in the marketplace. - 10/13/16

  • Paul Johnson of Geophysics (EES-17)

    Trinity ushers in new age of supercomputing

    As the Lab begins testing the second half of its new supercomputer, Trinity, the occasion highlights how intertwined scientific breakthroughs and computer innovations have become — and what a seminal and central role Los Alamos has played in that synergy. - 9/12/16

  • Hot-cast perovskite solar cells show promise for creating more efficient and affordable solar panels, LEDs, and lasers. Image courtesy Los Alamos National Laboratory.

    Something new under the sun

    Recent research breakthroughs at Los Alamos National Laboratory are helping to deliver on the promise of truly “cheap solar,” with several surprising side benefits. - 8/4/16

  • A helicopter drops fire retardant on wildfire during 2011 Las Conchas fire in New Mexico.

    Burning questions in study of wildfire

    Understanding what drives big fires and predicting their behavior helps the fire community prepare for the next blaze through appropriate land management, emergency plans and firefighting strategies. - 7/12/16

  • Science on the Hill: Fragile life underfoot has big impact on desert

    Fragile life underfoot has big impact on desert

    Anyone who spends time in the high-desert landscape of Northern New Mexico has come across biological soil crusts, or biocrusts. This fragile crust fills a pivotal ecosystem niche. However, its survival is being challenged by threats from climate change and man-made disturbance. - 6/13/16

  • Science on the Hill: Gravitational waves open new window on universe

    Gravitational waves open new window on universe

    Viewing the very large and very small workings of what's out there. - 5/8/16

  • Science on the Hill: Why space weather matters

    Why space weather matters

    Many people think of space as a silent, empty void and the sun as a distant source of light and heat. Not true. The sun and the Earth are connected in complex, intimate and sometimes dangerous ways. - 4/10/16

  • Paul Johnson of Geophysics (EES-17)

    Can we someday predict earthquakes?

    New ways of looking at seismic information and innovative laboratory experiments are offering tantalizing clues to what triggers earthquakes — and when. - 3/14/16

  • solar panel windows

    Turning windows into solar panels

    Working with quantum dots, researchers achieve a breakthrough in solar-concentrating technology that can turn windows into electric generators. - 2/7/16

  • Forecasting flu

    The forecast calls for flu

    Using mathematics, computer programs, statistics and information about how disease develops and spreads, a research team at Los Alamos National Laboratory found a way to forecast the flu season and even next week’s sickness trends. - 1/15/16

  • LANL scientist Richard Sayre

    Driving toward an algae-powered future

    A new research project led by Los Alamos National Laboratory seeks to drive algal biofuels to marketability, decreasing our nation’s dependence on fossil fuels and putting the brakes on global warming. - 12/24/15

  • water

    Quenching New Mexico's thirst with brackish water

    Whether today turns out damp or dry, drought is a fact of life in New Mexico. So where can we get more water? - 11/15/15

  • Jumpstarting the carbon capture industry: Science on the Hill

    Jumpstarting the carbon capture industry

    Carbon capture, utilization, and storage can provide a crucial bridge between our current global energy economy and a cleaner, more diversified energy future. Researchers demonstrate that this approach is technically feasible and poised for full-scale roll-out. - 10/16/15

  • Los Alamos physicists developed a quantum random number generator and a quantum communication system, both of which exploit the weird and immutable laws of quantum physics to improve cybersecurity.

    For cybersecurity, in quantum encryption we trust

    Los Alamos physicists developed a quantum random number generator and communication system that exploits quantum physics to improve cybersecurity. - 9/13/15

  • portable mri

    Portable MRI might make the world a better place

    Los Alamos' Battlefield MRI uses ultra-low-field magnetic resonance imaging to create images of the brain that can be used in field hospitals or in remote villages. - 8/9/15

  • methane map

    Methane cloud hunting

    Los Alamos researchers go hunting for methane gas over the Four Corners area of northwest New Mexico and find a strange daily pattern. - 7/12/15

  • March 1, 2015 Los Alamos biomedical scientist Harshini Mukundan.  Los Alamos biomedical scientist Harshini Mukundan

    Rapid diagnosis a new weapon against re-emerging TB

    Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory have developed an innovative tool set for the early and accurate diagnosis of tuberculosis. - 6/7/15


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