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Quenching New Mexico's thirst with brackish water

Whether today turns out damp or dry, drought is a fact of life in New Mexico. So where can we get more water?
November 15, 2015
water

Brackish, or salty, water may prove an invaluable liquid resource for New Mexico.

Science on the Hill: Quenching New Mexico's thirst with brackish water

by Jeri Sullivan Graham

Whether today turns out damp or dry, drought is a fact of life in New Mexico. With our rivers and aquifers already divvied up to the last drop, where can we get more water to ease the pressure on our freshwater resources?

One major source is right below our feet in New Mexico and has gone mostly untapped: likely billions of gallons of brackish groundwater. Focused efforts now underway can divert this salty water into the mix for drinking and other uses if we overcome the challenges of inventorying the aquifers and desalinating, or treating, the water cost-effectively while protecting the environment.

This article first appeared in the Santa Fe New Mexican.


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