Los Alamos National Laboratory

Los Alamos National Laboratory

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Jumpstarting the carbon capture industry

Carbon capture, utilization, and storage can provide a crucial bridge between our current global energy economy and a cleaner, more diversified energy future. Researchers demonstrate that this approach is technically feasible and poised for full-scale roll-out.
October 16, 2015
Jumpstarting the carbon capture industry: Science on the Hill

Amount and type of CO2 emissions vary across the United States. Bar height is proportional to total CO2 emissions and bar color represents the type of CO2 emissions on a 50-by-50 kilometer grid. Red bars represent proportionately more CO2 emissions from electricity generation (coal, gas and oil), green bars represent CO2 emissions by other sources (such as ethanol production, iron-steel production and cement manufacture), and yellow/orange bars signifying a mix of electricity and nonelectricity sources. Image courtesy of Los Alamos National Lab.

Science on the Hill: Jumpstarting the carbon capture industry

by Richard S. Middleton

Carbon capture, utilization, and storage can provide a crucial bridge between our current global energy economy and a cleaner, more diversified energy future. Researchers from Los Alamos National Laboratory, Ohio State University and the National Energy Technology Laboratory have demonstrated that this approach is technically feasible and poised for full-scale roll-out.

Carbon capture involves diverting and compressing byproduct carbon dioxide gas (CO2) at the flue of coal-fired power plants and other emitters and subsequently transporting it in dedicated pipelines for injection into deep geologic reservoirs. As an alternative to this last step, manufacturers can use CO2 gas to make marketable products. Either way, this approach could prevent millions of tons of industrial greenhouse gas emissions from entering the atmosphere every year as we strive to combat anthropogenic climate change.

This article first appeared in the Santa Fe New Mexican.


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