Los Alamos National Laboratory

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Why is Zika now a threat?

Population growth, rising temperatures, embryonic immune systems says Lab scientist
February 25, 2016
Human-gorilla divergence may have occurred two million years earlier than thought (Photo : Flickr: Rod Waddington)

Human-gorilla divergence may have occurred two million years earlier than thought (Photo credit: Flickr, Rod Waddington)

Viruses like Zika are similar to Ebola in that they replicate in animal populations, where they are endemic.

Why is Zika now a threat?

by Elena E. Giorgi

Mostly innocuous and fairly unknown until a few weeks ago, the Zika virus is suddenly dominating the news. Under scrutiny is the virus's putative link with a congenital birth defect called microcephaly, which causes babies to be born with abnormally small heads and undeveloped brains.

This article first appeared in HuffPost Science.


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