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May 1, 2014
Los Alamos postdoctoral fellow William Rice holds a crystal of strontium titanate up to the light. This crystal, previously thought to be nonmagnetic, turns out to have surprising magnetic features when treated with special “circularly polarized” light

Los Alamos postdoctoral fellow William Rice holds a crystal of strontium titanate up to the light. This crystal, previously thought to be nonmagnetic, turns out to have surprising magnetic features when treated with special “circularly polarized” light

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News stories

Flipping the switch on magnetism in strontium titanate

Interest in oxide-based semiconductor electronics has exploded in recent years, fueled largely by the ability to grow atomically precise layers of various oxide materials. One of the most important materials in this burgeoning field is strontium titanate (SrTiO3), a nominally nonmagnetic wide-bandgap semiconductor, and researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory have found a way to magnetize this material using light, an effect that persists for hours at a time.

ATHENA desktop human “body” could reduce need for animal drug tests

Creating surrogate human organs, coupled with insights from highly sensitive mass spectrometry technologies, a new project is on the brink of revolutionizing the way we screen new drugs and toxic agents.

ATHENA, the Advanced Tissue-engineered Human Ectypal Network Analyzer project team, is developing four human organ constructs – liver, heart, lung and kidney – that are based on a significantly miniaturized platform. Each organ component will be about the size of a smartphone screen, and the whole ATHENA “body” of interconnected organs would fit neatly on a desk.

Chevron, GE form Technology Alliance

Chevron Energy Technology Company and GE Oil & Gas announced today the creation of the Chevron GE Technology Alliance, which will develop and commercialize valuable technologies to solve critical needs for the oil and gas industry.

The Alliance builds upon a current collaboration on flow analysis technology for oil and gas wells. It will leverage research and development from GE’s newest Global Research Center, the first dedicated to oil and gas technology.

Publications

New issue of 1663: Los Alamos Science and Technology Magazine

New Videos

Los Alamos Shows Airport Security Technology at Work

A Tribute to 75 Years of Fission


Innovations for a secure nation

Lab team makes unique contributions to the first bionic eye

Lab team makes unique contributions to the first bionic eye

The Argus II will help people blinded by the rare hereditary disease retinitis pigmentosa or seniors suffering from severe macular degeneration.

» All Innovations

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