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Bradbury Science Museum

Pi Day of the Century

WHEN:
Mar 14, 2015 11:00 AM - 1:00 PM
WHERE:
Bradbury Science Museum
1350 Central Ave, Los Alamos, New Mexico, USA
CONTACT:
Jessica Privette
505 667-0375
CATEGORY:
INTERNAL:
Pi

Event Description

A special day celebrating this once-in-a-century occasion.

Pi Day is an annual celebration commemorating the mathematical constant π, a never-ending, transcendental number representing the ratio of a circle’s circumference to its diameter.  Sometimes written as Pi, it is approximately equal to 3.14159. Because of this, Pi day is observed on March 14 (3/14… get it?). This year, the occasion will be once-in-a-century because the first 10 digits of the infinite series will be perfectly aligned around 9:26 AM (i.e., 3/14/15 9:26:53).

In honor of this special occasion, the Bradbury Science Museum will be offering a number of events and activities:

  • Attend a fun and fascinating lecture hosted by the Bradbury Science Museum and given by Los Alamos National Laboratory mathematicians from Noon to 1:00 PM at Time Out Pizzeria in Los Alamos while enjoying a pizza ‘pi’. (To learn more, click here);
  • Interact with hands-on Pi-related activities throughout the museum all day;
  • Speak to Scientist Ambassadors from 11:00 AM to 1:00 PM at the museum about things like sea ice, computers, and magnets (To learn more, click here);
  • Watch a live robotics demonstration from 11:00 AM to 1:00 PM at the museum given by local FIRST LEGO League teams, a group of Los Alamos Girl Scouts. (To learn more, click here).

Today, Pi is used for everything from calculating the size of planets outside of our solar system to figuring out how to get the most out of your money when ordering a pizza. To learn more about these applications of Pi, try exploring these web pages.

5 Ways NASA uses Pi:     http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/education/index.cfm?page=371
Using Pi to Order Pizza:   http://www.avclub.com/article/heres-mathematical-proof-you-should-always-order-b-201629