Los Alamos National Laboratory

Los Alamos National Laboratory

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SensorNexus

Our sensor capabilities working for your solutions

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Connect to in-depth capabilities and multidisciplinary sensor expertise.

Contact Us! sensornexus@lanl.gov

Ammonia Sensor

Mass producing low-cost, robust ammonia sensors.

LAUR: 16-22572

Benefits/Features

  • Combines Unique Electrode Design for Sensor Stability and Reliable Response - LANL's thin film mixed potential ammonia sensors combine dense gold sensing electrodes and porous electrolytes to create electrode stability and produce a stable sensor response. Los Alamos’s patented method of tape casting the electrolytes bypasses traditional methods for embedding and sintering electrodes in an electrolyte by hand.
  • Direct Automotive and Industrial Emissions Systems Applications – LANL’s Ammonia Gas Sensors can be applied to a vast array of systems to improve and verify efficiencies.
  • Designed for Sample Reproducibility and Stable Selectivity
  • – The technology was designed with exceptional heater stability, sample reproducibility and stable selectivity represent substantial strides towards these goals.
Publications

E. L. Brosha, J.A. Pihl, C. R. Kreller, V. Y. Prikhodko, S. Curran, J.E. Parks II, and R. Mukundan, “Response Characteristics of a Stable Mixed Potential Sensor in Simulated Diesel Exhaust,” 228th Meeting of the Electrochemical Society, Phoenix AZ, October 2015.

E. L. Brosha, C. R. Kreller, V. Y. Prikhodko, J.A. Pihl, S. Curran, J.E. Parks II, and R. Mukundan, “Performance Evaluation of Mixed-Potential HC, NOx, and NH3 Sensors in Diesel and Lean Gasoline Exhaust,” DOE Crosscut Lean/Low-tempearture Exhaust Emissions Reduction Simulation CLEERS Workshop/Conference, Dearborn, MI, April 27-29, 2015.

E. L. Brosha, C. R. Kreller, V. Y. Prikhodko, J.A. Pihl, S. Curran, J.E. Parks II, and R. Mukundan, “Performance Evaluation of Mixed-Potential NOx and NH3 Sensors in Diesel and Lean Gasoline Exhaust,” in preparation, Winter 2016.

Patents

U.S. Patent # 6,656,336, “Method for Forming a Potential Hydrocarbon Sensor with Low Sensitivity to Methane and CO, issued Dec 2, 2003 (DOE S-97,844).

U.S. Patent # 6,605,202, “Electrodes for Solid State Gas Sensor”, issued Aug 12, 2003 (DOE S-99,902).

U.S. Patent # 7,214,333, “Electrodes for Solid State Gas Sensor”, issued May 8, 2007 (DOE S-100,634).

U.S. Patent # 7,264,700, “Thin Film Mixed Potential Sensors”; issued Sept. 4, 2007 (DOE S-100,655).

Development Stage

TRL 7.  Pre-commercial form of Sensors tested in Diesel Engine and Lean Burn Direct Injection Engine Exhaust / Engine Dynamometers. Dynamometer testing at the National Transportation Research Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Oak Ridge, TN.

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