Los Alamos National Laboratory

Los Alamos National Laboratory

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Everything you need to know about summer student housing, the new app for Manhattan Project National Historical Park, and more.
April 4, 2016
 The soon-to-be-released Secret City app will let visitors to downtown Los Alamos see how the landscape looked in the 1940s when it was a key technical area for the Manhattan Project.

The soon-to-be-released Secret City app will let visitors to downtown Los Alamos see how the landscape looked in the 1940s when it was a key technical area for the Manhattan Project.

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The Secret City app will allow users to view Los Alamos from anywhere in the world, almost like a computer game.

The Secret City of the Manhattan Project app

This spring, visitors will be able to stand in downtown Los Alamos and—via a free iPad app developed by the Laboratory’s Visible Team and the Bradbury Science Museum—see how the landscape looked in the 1940s when it was a key technical area for the Manhattan Project.

A second feature of the Secret City app will allow users “to view Los Alamos from anywhere in the world, almost like a computer game,” explains Laboratory historian Ellen McGehee.

Users of the app will thus see many of the Laboratory’s original buildings that are in the new Manhattan Project National Historical Park (MPNHP) but not yet ready for public admission.

To download the app, keep an eye on the App Store. For more about accessing MPNHP buildings at Los Alamos, read “Manhattan Project National Historical Park” in the April 2016 issue of National Security Science magazine.

List summer rentals on internhousing.com

Employees or local residents hoping to rent a house, apartment, or room to incoming LANL summer students can list the property at no cost on internhousing.com. Access to the site is password protected, and only LANL students can see the listings. Property owners can access and deactivate their listings at any time. 

“Internhousing.com is able to do a much more thorough search of the local rental markets, so we are expecting a greater number of options for students this year,” says Scott Robbins of the LANL Student Programs Office. “The platform also does a better job supporting students searching for roommates than we were able to do out of our office.” 

To create a free listing, go to internhousing.com. Contact Josefina Salazar (505-665-0987) in the Student Programs Office with questions.

New internship program pairs local businesses and students

CIC graduates included Esperanza Tapia, a junior at LAHS who interned at Journey Pacific; Daniel Roybal, a business major at UNM-LA who partnered with the Finishing Touch; and Kim Lopez, another high school junior, who worked at CB Fox Department Store.

New internship program pairs local businesses and students

Thanks to the Community Internship Collaboration (CIC), UNM-Los Alamos undergraduates and Los Alamos High School (LAHS) upperclassmen can have the experience of working for a local business, earn some money, and get academic credit—all at no cost to the business.

CIC, which currently has 15 students placed in internships around Los Alamos, graduated its first group of interns on March 8, marking the program’s success.

CIC is a joint partnership of the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Security, LLC, UNM-Los Alamos, Los Alamos High School, and the Small Business Development Center. The program is made possible by a financial investment from Los Alamos National Security, LLC.

McCurdy Schools science and swim program

Scientist Dmitri Mendeleev, looking great for being 182 years old, shares his development of the periodic table of elements for students from McCurdy Charter School at the Bradbury Science Museum.

McCurdy School’s science and swim program

For 41 fifth graders at McCurdy Charter School, science and swimming go hand in hand—or at least they have for the past four weeks. “We visit the Bradbury Science Museum four different times, exploring a new topic each time, and afterward the students take swimming lessons at the Larry R. Walkup Aquatic Center,” explains teacher Zelda Jaramillo.

Topics at the Bradbury included atoms, elements, static electricity, cryogenics, and the Manhattan Project. “The students are just beaming with excitement before and after each lesson,” says Jaramillo, who has been running the science and swim program for 11 years. “You see how totally engaged they are at the museum and how much improvement is gained from the first to the last swimming lesson—the effort of getting students from Española to Los Alamos is definitely worth it!”


Community Connections features news and opportunities that grow out of the Laboratory’s Good Neighbor Pledge: “To partner with our neighbors on strengthening math and science learning, diversifying the economy and expanding community giving in Northern New Mexico.”


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