Los Alamos National Laboratory

Los Alamos National Laboratory

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Past Platinum Award winner discusses LAESF impact in new podcast; Free admission for active-duty military, family members; High-angle canyon-side legacy cleanup; Santa Fe Radio Café replay
June 1, 2015
Alicia Salazar-Crockett was the 2008 Platinum Award winner of the Los Alamos Employees’ Scholarship Fund. On the left is Salazar-Crockett as a student intern in 2008, on the right as a full-time Laboratory employee in 2015.

Alicia Salazar-Crockett was the 2008 Platinum Award winner of the Los Alamos Employees’ Scholarship Fund. On the left is Salazar-Crockett as a student intern in 2008, on the right as a full-time Laboratory employee in 2015.

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  • Community Programs Director (Acting)
  • Carole Rutten
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Past Platinum Award winner discusses LAESF impact in new podcast

In the How The Los Alamos Employees' Scholarship Fund Changed My Life podcast produced by the Laboratory’s Community Programs Office, Alicia Salazar-Crockett, 2008 Platinum Award winner of the Los Alamos Employees’ Scholarship Fund (LAESF), discusses the impact the LAESF award has had on her life.

“Alicia is the perfect example of the scholarship fund in action to deliver our workforce of the future,” said Carole Rutten, acting Community Programs Director at Los Alamos. “At 18 years of age, she received the top scholarship from LAESF for her undergraduate studies. She went on to receive her graduate degree in nuclear engineering. Now she is a full-time Laboratory employee.”

At this point in her life, Salazar-Crockett is able to repay some of the assistance she received by contributing to LAESF herself.

“I knew what kind of life I wanted, and college was a part of that,” Salazar-Crocket said. “I also knew I would need some help financially. I may not be able to repay the whole amount, but knowing that my contribution to the fund will help the next generation is an amazing feeling.”

The Laboratory-focused fundraising campaign for the 2016 LAESF scholarship program is currently underway and will end on June 19, 2015.

To contribute year-round, community members and other generous individuals and organizations can visit LAESF’s Make a Pledge website.

Free admission for active-duty military, family members

Los Alamos National Laboratory’s Bradbury Science Museum is again partnering with the National Endowment for the Arts, Blue Star Families Foundation and the Department of Defense in the Blue Star Museums program to host active-duty military personnel and their families from Memorial Day through Labor Day.

“The Bradbury Science Museum is excited and proud to be part of the 2,000 museums throughout the United States participating in the Blue Star Museums program to thank our nation’s military personnel—and their families—for their service,” Bradbury Science Museum Director Linda Deck said.

“The museum already has a free-admission policy, but we’re participating in this program to raise awareness of the importance of honoring members of the U.S. armed services, as we share our collective history,” Deck noted.

The Bradbury Science Museum features films and interactive exhibits interpreting Los Alamos National Laboratory’s contributions to modern science, research and technology, including its role in the Manhattan Project and current mission in national security.

The museum is open daily except Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s Day and is located at 15th Street and Central Avenue in downtown Los Alamos.

For more information, go to the Bradbury Science Museum website or contact the museum’s Jessica Privette at (505) 667-0375.

To learn more about the Blue Star Museums program, check the National Endowment for the Arts’ Blue Star Museums website.

High-angle canyon-side legacy cleanup

Los Alamos National Laboratory currently is performing a high-angle canyon-side legacy cleanup on U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) property just south of the new Smith’s Marketplace in Los Alamos.

“We are committed to reducing the Laboratory’s historical footprint and intend to continue to make progress on environmental legacy cleanup,” Christine Gelles of the DOE’s Los Alamos Field Office said.

In collaboration with experts from contractor TerranearPMC, the Laboratory’s Environmental Remediation program uses a specialized telescoping crane and spider excavator to remove a small area of mercury-contaminated soil that derived from the Manhattan Project and early Cold War era operations at former Technical Area 32.

“During the 1940s and 1950s there was no understanding of the consequences associated with these types of releases,” said Dave McInroy, director for the Environmental Remediation program. “The complexity of this job demonstrates the Lab’s commitment to remedy all historical discretions.”

Before leaving the site, experts will evaluate results of confirmatory samples to ensure that the cleanup is complete and restore the project site.

The legacy cleanup project is a cooperative effort with Los Alamos County and the property owner.

Santa Fe Radio Café replay

A replay of the May 5 interview with Laboratory scientist Manvendra Dubey on Santa Fe Radio Café (KSFR 101.1) is available on Santa Fe Radio Café's Science Radio Café webpage. Dubey discusses his team’s research on a large methane hotspot over the Four Corners area.


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