Los Alamos National Laboratory

Los Alamos National Laboratory

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In other news

Accelerate Technical Training; Earl Salazar reelected as tribal governor; Future City regional finals; winners of the Earth and Environmental Science Scholarship; Los Alamos County Science and Engineering Fair
February 1, 2015
James H. Rodriguez Elementary School students Danny Serrano (second from left), José Olivas and Angel Valdez with their teacher, Jimmy Lara (right), and Laboratory volunteer Mark Bibeault during the Future City regional finals in Albuquerque.

James H. Rodriguez Elementary School students Danny Serrano (second from left), José Olivas and Angel Valdez with their teacher, Jimmy Lara (right), and Laboratory volunteer Mark Bibeault during the Future City regional finals in Albuquerque.

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Accelerate Technical Training receives 2015 funding commitment

The Department of Energy’s Office of Environmental Management has announced that it will fully fund the fifth and final year of a five-year grant for northern New Mexico’s Accelerate Technical Training and Job Placement Program. As its primary objective, Accelerate prepares a workforce for educational and career advancement in northern New Mexico, whether at Los Alamos National Laboratory, its subcontractors or other regional employers.

To familiarize yourself with the program, check the Accelerate website.

Earl Salazar reelected as tribal governor

Earl Salazar, the Laboratory’s tribal liaison, was recently reelected as governor of Ohkay Owingeh Pueblo (formerly San Juan Pueblo), an office he has occupied on and off since 1996. Salazar succeeded Elmer Torres as tribal liaison in August 2011 when Torres retired after 41 years of service, the last decade of which he was involved with the Laboratory’s tribal affairs efforts. While Salazar is on tribal service leave from the Laboratory, Torres has agreed to return to the tribal liaison position on a short-term interim basis.

Students tackled regional infrastructure and natural resource challenges during the Future City regional finals

During the January 24 regional finals of the national Future City Competition, middle school students from New Mexico and Colorado had a chance to showcase their solutions for feeding future cities—this year’s theme. The students used their collective imagination and skills in engineering, environmental science and art to integrate existing food supplies into critical infrastructures that can meet the demands of growing populations.

The Laboratory, Los Alamos National Security, LLC and the National Nuclear Security Administration were among the regional finals' sponsors, and several Laboratory staff members were judges and mentors.

A group from Deer Creek Middle School in Littleton, Colorado, won first place, with the following northern New Mexico teams earning recognition as well:

    • Communication Design: The Shadow City team from the James H. Rodriguez Elementary School in Española.
    • Unique Architectural Model: The City of Crystal Water team, also from the James H. Rodriguez Elementary School.
    • Irrigation Infrastructure: The Chilitopia team from McCurdy Charter School in Española.
    • Creative Use of Recycled Materials: The Panopolis team from the Turquoise Trail Charter School in Santa Fe.
    • Safety Design: The Naviopolis team, also from the Turquoise Trail Charter School.
    • Social Interaction Design: The Chronic Crystal team from Taos Middle School.
    • Globalization: The Epic Empire team, also from Taos Middle School.

For a complete list of the winners, check Future City’s winner overview webpage. The winning teams will advance to the national finals, which will take place in mid-February in Washington, D.C.

Winners of the Earth and Environmental Science Scholarship

Helen Milenksi, a nontraditional student attending the University of New Mexico-Los Alamos, and Chad Brown, a Native American student at Northern New Mexico College, have been selected to receive the Earth and Environmental Science Scholarship established on behalf of Jeri Sullivan Graham, a Laboratory scientist. The scholarship is funded through the 2014 Conservation Grant Award that Sullivan Graham received from the Climate Change Leadership Institute.

Milenski hopes to become a mechanical engineer and at the same time pursue an interest in materials science in order to help create new materials that safely meet the needs of people as well as the environment.

Brown would like to build on his experience of working for the Santa Clara Pueblo Forestry Department by obtaining a forestry degree and helping to maintain the health of tribal forests.

To learn more about the scholarship, check the New scholarship pays it forward story in the December 2014 issue of Community Connections.

Los Alamos County Science and Engineering Fair draws record number of students

Several hundred Los Alamos students in grades kindergarten through grade 12 (including home-schooled students) competed for $12,000 in prizes during the Los Alamos County Science and Engineering Fair. Seventy students in grades six through 12 advance to the Northeastern New Mexico Regional Science Fair on March 7 at New Mexico Highlands University.

The Laboratory and Los Alamos National Security, LLC were sponsors of the event. Numerous Laboratory staff members served on the Science Fair Committee and as mentors and judges across a number of scientific disciplines.


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