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Gable named Geological Society of America Fellow

GSA members are elected to fellowship in recognition of their distinguished contributions to the geosciences.
July 10, 2013
Carl Gable

Carl Gable

Gable received a doctorate in Geophysics from Harvard University and joined Los Alamos as a postdoc in 1989.

The Geological Society of America (GSA) has selected Carl Gable of the Laboratory's Computational Earth Science group to be a Fellow. GSA members are elected to fellowship in recognition of their distinguished contributions to the geosciences. The election committee cited publications of geologic research and applied research as the primary reasons for Gable’s recognition.

Achievements

Gable received a doctorate in Geophysics from Harvard University and joined Los Alamos as a postdoc in 1989. He currently is the group leader of EES-16. Gable’s scientific contributions include computational geometry and mesh generation for geological applications, computational modeling of fluid flow and reactive transport in porous and fractured media, hydrothermal systems, geodynamics, mantle convection and plate tectonics modeling. Gable was a member of a large team that received a Laboratory Distinguished Performance Award for the Yucca Mountain Project.

About the Geological Society of America

Established in 1888, The Geological Society of America is a global professional society with a growing membership of more than 25,000 individuals in 107 countries. Its mission is to advance geoscience research and discovery, service to society, stewardship of Earth and the geosciences profession.


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