Skip to Content Skip to Search Skip to Utility Navigation Skip to Top Navigation Skip to Content Navigation
Los Alamos National Laboratory

Los Alamos National Laboratory

Delivering science and technology to protect our nation and promote world stability

New exhibit highlights the archaeology, wildlife and climate of Los Alamos

The Bradbury Science Museum unveils a new interactive exhibit "Environmental Research and Monitoring" on Sept. 17.
September 11, 2014
A standing wall at the Nake'muu Pueblo archaeological site on Los Alamos National Laboratory property.

A standing wall at the Nake'muu Pueblo archaeological site on Los Alamos National Laboratory property.

Contact  

  • Steve Sandoval
  • Communications Office
  • (505) 665-9206
  • Email
"This new exhibit helps us to do public outreach and provide virtual access to some of the unique archaeological sites situated on Laboratory property.”

Opens Sept. 17 at Laboratory’s Bradbury Science Museum

LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Sept. 11, 2014—The Bradbury Science Museum unveils a new interactive exhibit at 4 p.m., Sept. 17 featuring the rich history and current research into archaeology, wildlife biology, local climate and sustainability efforts at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

“Our role is to support the mission of the Laboratory while being good stewards of the environment,” said Jen Payne, a team leader in the Laboratory’s Environmental Stewardship Services Group and exhibit curator. “The National Historic Preservation Act requires us to share our knowledge of cultural resources with the public. This new exhibit helps us to do public outreach and provide virtual access to some of the unique archaeological sites situated on Laboratory property.”

The exhibit is titled “Environmental Research and Monitoring.” Opening remarks start at 5 p.m., and a talk on the Laboratory’s annual Environmental Report is scheduled for 6 p.m. During the evening, two of the Bradbury’s Scientist Ambassadors will be “Scientists in the Spotlight,” with engaging face-to-face materials prompting conversations about fresh water and sea ice. Attendees also can play the “Thirst for Power” game that explores the nexus of energy, water and climate.

The exhibit shows in posters, interactive elements and videos the Laboratory’s compliance work and research into the diverse archaeological and biological resources found here, as well as local climate research and the Laboratory’s environmental sustainability activities. It also shows how current Laboratory research into tree mortality is giving clues to how global climate change will affect our local area, and lets visitors learn about energy savings activities in Lab facilities.

Laboratory property has a rich diversity of archaeology and wildlife. Nearly 2,000 historic properties spanning 5,500 years of human history have been identified on Laboratory land. Three threatened and endangered species plus a wide diversity of birds, bats, owls, large animals, and other mammals call this land home.

In archaeology, the exhibit traces this area’s extensive human history and focuses on Laboratory excavations and research in the past 50 years. The wildlife section of the new exhibit showcase the Laboratory’s research, compliance and protection efforts of three threatened and endangered species living here, as well as large animal and migratory bird studies.

Interactive

The exhibit’s interactive elements include two new iPad apps. “Owls and Bats of Los Alamos,” allows museum visitors to identify various species of bats and owls living in local habitats, listen to owl calls, and test their knowledge in a quiz.

“Los Alamos Archaeology: 5,000 Years of History,” allows visitors to explore and learn about extensive archaeological sites and artifacts identified on Laboratory grounds, dating from 5,500 years ago up to the Manhattan Project.

Also featured is a 3-D movie, “Nake’muu: Village on the Edge,” which allows visitors to experience a virtual tour of Nake’muu Pueblo, an 800-year-old archaeological site that has standing masonry walls.

“This standing wall Pueblo is not accessible to the public because of its restricted location,” said Payne. “The virtual tour allows museum visitors to experience site first-hand. It allows visitors and long-time residents of the area to experience this unique archaeological site situated on DOE property.”

Refreshments will be served, and the museum will be giving out free tree seedlings to plant and free water bottles during the opening.

Caption for image below: A Cavate site with petroglyphs on Laboratory property.

About Los Alamos National Laboratory

Los Alamos National Laboratory, a multidisciplinary research institution engaged in strategic science on behalf of national security, is operated by Los Alamos National Security, LLC, a team composed of Bechtel National, the University of California, BWXT Government Group, and URS, an AECOM company, for the Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration.

Los Alamos enhances national security by ensuring the safety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile, developing technologies to reduce threats from weapons of mass destruction, and solving problems related to energy, environment, infrastructure, health, and global security concerns.


Visit Blogger Join Us on Facebook Follow Us on Twitter See our Flickr Photos Watch Our YouTube Videos Find Us on LinkedIn Find Us on iTunesFind Us on GooglePlay