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Acoustics topic of upcoming Frontiers in Science series

Dipen Sinha will discuss acoustics and its applications, including how it is possible to use sound to solve problems in health, national security and for industry.
July 24, 2014
 Whenever an object vibrates, it creates sound, vibrations can 0:19 be detected. Besides just listening to it, we can detect it with various sensors. We 0:25 can tell what's inside a single container from the sound or vibration it makes. Essentially 0:31 like playing an object like a musical instrument. We can tell what's going through a pipe or 0:38 containers filled with some liquid without opening it. We also use the pressure wave 0:44 of sound to move things around. We can create structures, interesting patterns and various 0:51 to create new materials. And so that's what I'm really interested in, is using sound in 0:56 various different ways to do useful things.

People are immersed in a universe filled with sound and experience it daily through hearing and vibration, according to Sinha. Sound is created by vibration and travels as waves through any medium in a number of ways. Observing how these waves interact with any medium can help researchers identify the medium even if it is hidden inside sealed containers, he added.

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“I take advantage of the nature of sound waves and often manipulate these waves to solve technically challenging problems related to energy and national security,” Sinha said.

Tapping sound waves to address energy, national security challenges

LOS ALAMOS, N.M., July 24, 2014—Dipen Sinha of Los Alamos National Laboratory’s Materials Synthesis and Integrated Devices group will discuss acoustics and its applications, including how it is possible to use sound to solve problems in health, national security and for industry, in a series of Frontiers in Science Lectures beginning July 29 at Crossroads Bible Church in Los Alamos.

“I take advantage of the nature of sound waves and often manipulate these waves to solve technically challenging problems related to energy and national security,” Sinha said. “How an object vibrates also tells a lot about it. Sound can exert force on objects. By carefully manipulating acoustic forces it is possible to create novel structures and even unique materials that are otherwise not possible with conventional fabrication processes.”

Los Alamos Frontiers in Science Lecture: Science of Sound
1:08

Los Alamos Frontiers in Science Lecture: Science of Sound

People are immersed in a universe filled with sound and experience it daily through hearing and vibration, according to Sinha. Sound is created by vibration and travels as waves through any medium in a number of ways. Observing how these waves interact with any medium can help researchers identify the medium even if it is hidden inside sealed containers, he added. 

All Frontiers in Science lectures begin at 7 p.m. at the following locations:

  • Tuesday, July 29 at the Crossroads Bible Church, 97 East Road, Los Alamos
  • Wednesday, July 30 at the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, 1801 Mountain Road NW, Albuquerque
  • Tuesday, Aug. 5 at the James A. Little Theater New Mexico School for the Deaf 1060 Cerrillos Road, Santa Fe.

About the speaker

Sinha is currently a Laboratory Fellow and leads the Acoustics and Sensors team at the Laboratory. Sinha joined the Laboratory as a postdoctoral fellow to work in the field of low-temperature physics in 1980. In 1983, he moved to industry before returning to Los Alamos in 1986 as a staff scientist and developed ultra-high speed measurement techniques, femtosecond lasers, thermionic integrated circuits and Langmuir-Blodgett films. Faced with a very challenging technical problem to solve for the United States government, he switched his research career and taught himself acoustics. He developed the Acoustic Resonance Spectroscopy and the Swept Frequency Acoustic Interferometry techniques specifically to solve these problems.

His research explores new ways to “see” the invisible, with applications that include the development of techniques for acoustic noninvasive chemical identification, petroleum monitoring in oil wells, imaging objects with sound and a wide range of sensors and sensing technologies in many areas of science and technology. He has won four R&D100 Awards and holds 33 patents.

About Los Alamos National Laboratory

Los Alamos National Laboratory, a multidisciplinary research institution engaged in strategic science on behalf of national security, is operated by Los Alamos National Security, LLC, a team composed of Bechtel National, the University of California, The Babcock & Wilcox Company, and URS for the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration.

Los Alamos enhances national security by ensuring the safety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile, developing technologies to reduce threats from weapons of mass destruction, and solving problems related to energy, environment, infrastructure, health, and global security concerns.


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