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Stone's code reveals Earth’s processes

The returning student researches carbon sequestration to determine the best methods to capture the greenhouse gas that increases global warming.
August 27, 2013
Ian Stone

At the Lab’s Earth and Environmental Sciences (EES) Division, Stone helps monitor movement of Earth's crust while predicting the effects of these events on the environment. He uses his photographic lens to record the effects of a more personal environment on the self.

    “I am definitely getting real-world experience and this experience will make me a much more attractive candidate for research opportunities,” says Stone.
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    Coding for simulations to help capture carbon dioxide

    Although Los Alamos geophysicist Ian Stone studies his namesake, his attention is not solely focused on the rocks beneath him. Rather, like the Renaissance’s greatest thinkers, he integrates science and art to better understand the natural world.

    The returning student researches carbon sequestration to determine the best methods to capture the greenhouse gas that increases global warming. An evocative nature photographer, Stone is also a magazine art director at the Colorado School of Mines, where he’s completing his undergraduate degree.

    At the Lab’s Earth and Environmental Sciences (EES) Division, Stone helps monitor movement of Earth's crust while predicting the effects of these events on the environment. In one project, he models subsurface ground motion caused by earthquakes to assess and improve subsurface storage of carbon dioxide.

    New Mexico’s mesas, rugged volcanoes and limestone caverns that Stone studies provide ample exploratory opportunities for this self-proclaimed “rock hound,” who’s amassed 500 pounds in his collection since his Alabama childhood. In awe of the Land of Enchantment’s landscape, Stone hikes and enjoys rock climbing and rafting.

    Stone says Los Alamos is not a mere student internship to note on a resume, assigning students demanding and applicable research backed by world-class technology. The interdisciplinary mentors Stone works with—including geophysicist Chris Bradley and the division’s computational engineers—are dedicated to the success of their students. He also is active in the Lab’s Student Association.

    “I am definitely getting real-world experience and this experience will make me a much more attractive candidate for research opportunities,” says Stone, adding that the Lab’s impressive and diverse networking opportunities have already provided opportunities to explore other areas of research.

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