Los Alamos National Laboratory

Los Alamos National Laboratory

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2018 Open Enrollment FAQs

Open Enrollment is your annual opportunity to review your benefits and make changes to your plan options
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What's New FAQs

Accidental Death & Dismemberment (AD&D)
  1. What changed with AD&D for 2018?

    The coverage for children has increased from age 23 to age 26. If you would like to cover a child on this plan that may have been previously dropped due to age, you will need to actively add that child to your AD&D coverage during Open Enrollment.

Life Insurance
  1. What is new with Life Insurance for 2018?

    During Open Enrollment, this is your one time opportunity to elect coverage up to the guaranteed issue (GI) amount, even if you were rejected in the past or decided not to enroll. The GI amounts are: 3x annual salary for you and $50,000 for a spouse/domestic partner. You must actively elect these levels if you are interested in this coverage.

    Newly enrolling at levels above the GI amounts will require a Personal Health Application (evidence of insurability) to be completed and reviewed by The Hartford.

  2. My current employee supplemental life insurance is at 2x my annual salary. Will I automatically move to 3x?

    No, you must actively elect 3x if that is your intention.

  3. My current employee supplemental life insurance is at 4x my annual salary. Will I automatically decrease to 3x?

    No, your coverage will remain at 4x unless you make a change at Open Enrollment.

  4. My current employee supplemental life insurance is at 2x my annual salary but I’d like to be at 5x my annual salary. How does this process work?

    During Open Enrollment, elect the 5x option. You will be enrolled in 3x (guaranteed issue amount). You will then receive an email from The Hartford with instructions on how to complete the online evidence of insurability process. The Hartford will review the request and communicate whether the additional coverage is approved or denied. If approved, the Benefits office will enroll you in the additional coverage.

  5. I would like to purchase life insurance on my spouse above the GI amount. How does that process work?

    In Worker Self Service, elect the coverage option you are interested in for your spouse. As a reminder, you must be enrolled in employee supplemental life insurance in order to enroll in dependent life insurance. The value of your spouse’s life insurance cannot be greater than 50% of the value of your own employee supplemental life insurance. You will then receive an email from The Hartford with instructions on how to complete the evidence of insurability process. The Hartford will review the request and communicate whether the additional coverage is approved or denied. If approved, the Benefits office will enroll your spouse in the additional coverage.

Alex: Benefit's New Benefits Counselor
  1. Who, or what, is Alex?

    Alex is an advanced electronic benefit counselor that will provide you with a personalized, one-on-one benefits conversation to help you in making your benefits decision. Choosing the same plans you have always had might not make sense if your needs or other factors have changed. So, before you enroll, spend a few minutes with Alex to make sure your benefits are the best fit for you and your family.

  2. Where do I find Alex? Can I use this tool offsite?

    Alex can be found by going to benefits.lanl.gov.

  3. Will using Alex replace going into Open Enrollment?

    No, you must still log into Oracle to complete your Open Enrollment elections for 2018 if you are making changes or are enrolling in a Flexible Spending Account (HCRA, DCRA or AERA).

  4. Does Alex save any information about me when I use the tool?

    No, Alex does not store any personal information about users.

 

General FAQs

General Topics
  1. When is 2018 Open Enrollment?

    2018 Open Enrollment will open October 30, 2017 and close November 16, 2017 at midnight, Mountain Time. Elections will take effect January 1, 2018.

  2. Am I required to log into Oracle Worker Self-Service even if I do not want to make any changes during this Open Enrollment?

    It is strongly recommended that you go into Open Enrollment to:

    • Review your benefit elections
    • Ensure the correct dependents are enrolled
    • Review and/or establish your beneficiaries

    This is a “passive” open enrollment. If you do not want to change your current benefit elections, you do not have to log into Worker Self-Service. If you want to participate in the Flexible Spending Accounts (Health Care Reimbursement Account, Dependent Care Reimbursement Account, or Adoption Assistance Expense Account) for 2018, you must go into Worker Self-Service to make your election.

    Going through the Open Enrollment system generally takes between 5-15 minutes.

  3. What guidance is available to help me select the right medical plan for 2018?

    The 2018 Open Enrollment website is employees’ central information source for selecting next year’s medical plan. The site provides guidance, including the 2018 Open Enrollment Guide; and frequently asked questions. Additionally, LANL HR-Benefits has launched an exciting and interactive tool, “Alex” to help you weigh your options. Find Alex on the Open Enrollment website.

  4. If I enroll in a given plan but later decide that I would prefer the other option, will I have the opportunity to change?

    You can switch plans during the Open Enrollment period or within 31 days of a qualified life event, such as: the birth or adoption of a child, marriage, divorce or losing coverage from another plan. Otherwise, you will have to wait until the next Open Enrollment period.

    While the Open Enrollment period is still open, you can make changes to your elections as many times as you need to. Be sure to submit your changes and print a confirmation page.

  5. Can I change my 401(k) contribution during Open Enrollment?

    Making 401(k) and Roth elections can be done at any time during the year; changes are not tied to Open Enrollment. Contact Fidelity to make changes.

  6. Do I need to do anything with beneficiaries during Open Enrollment?

    Yes. For each plan where beneficiaries can be designated, you will be prompted during the Open Enrollment process to select your beneficiaries. To add a name not yet listed, or to change a name, contact the Benefits Office at benefits@lanl.gov. It is recommended that you have that person’s date of birth and Social Security Number (if applicable) and if that person has ever had a Z number. If adding a new dependent, you will need to provide all required supporting documentation no later than November 8th; the Benefits Office will add the dependent for you into Oracle.

General HSA and HCRA
  1. How is a Health Savings Account different from a Health Care Reimbursement Account?

    Both a Health Savings Account (HSA) and Health Care Reimbursement Account (HCRA) allow you to pay for qualified medical expenses with pre-tax dollars. One key difference; however, is that HSA balances roll over from year to year, while any HCRA funds left unspent by the end of the plan year’s grace period will be forfeited.

  2. Can I have both a Health Savings Account and Health Care Reimbursement Account?

    No. Internal Revenue Service regulations do not allow individuals to receive tax-advantages through both a Health Savings Account (HSA) and Health Care Reimbursement Account (HCRA). You can only have one or the other.

    You also can’t have an HSA if someone else in your household owns a HCRA that potentially could be used for your medical expenses.

  3. How many pay periods will the payroll deductions for a Health Care Reimbursement Account or Health Savings Account be withdrawn in 2018 and when will the deductions begin?

    Both the HCRA and the HSA payroll deductions will be withdrawn from 26 paychecks in 2018, beginning with the January 4, 2018 payroll.

Health Care Account (HCA)
  1. What is a Health Care Account (HCA)?

    This is an account held at Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Mexico for employees who have enrolled in the PPO plan and are participating in the wellness program. When wellness incentives are earned, the incentives are deposited into the HCA. The money can be used to offset medical expenses, such as co-pays and co-insurance, for enrolled participants.

  2. Can I make contributions to my Health Care Account?

    No, this account is not eligible for employee contributions. LANL will use this account to distribute wellness incentives to participating employees enrolled in the PPO plan.

  3. Can I use the wellness incentive money I have earned in my Health Care Account (HCA) for the eligible expenses for anyone on my medical plan or just myself?

    The monies in the HCA can be used for eligible medical expenses for anyone covered on your LANL sponsored medical plan.

  4. How can I view the balance of my HCA?

    Employees can see their HCA balance on the BCBSNM website by logging into their Blue Access for Members account.

Health Savings Account (HSA)
  1. Who is eligible to open an HSA?

    You must have a qualified High Deductible Health Plan (HDHP) in order to be eligible to open an HSA. In addition:

    • You must have a valid Social Security Number (SSN) and a primary residence in the U.S.
    • You cannot be enrolled in any other type of health plan, including any part of Medicare such as Medicare Part A or B.
    • You cannot be covered by TriCare.
    • You cannot have accessed your VA or Indian Health Services medical benefits in the past 90 days (to contribute to an HSA).
    • You cannot be covered by any other medical flexible spending account (including a spouse’s medical FSA.)
    • You cannot be claimed as a dependent on another person's tax return (unless it's your spouse).

    Note: The HSA is an individually owned account; only the accountholder must meet the eligibility requirements to open the account and ensure that your account is opened. If other members of the accountholder’s family have other coverage or are covered by Medicare, that will not make the accountholder ineligible for an account. The funds in the HSA can be used for the accountholder’s spouse and qualified tax dependent’s qualified expenses regardless of the type of coverage they have.

  2. What guidance is available on the Health Savings Account?

    In addition to visiting the Laboratory’s Health Savings Account (HSA) website, you can visit the HSA Bank website for assistance.

    The Laboratory pays the monthly account maintenance fee for active employees who are the primary member covered in the HDHP. LANL has also negotiated special HSA Bank Account Fees for Premier Partners document (pdf).

  3. If I select the Health Savings Account Option in Oracle during Open Enrollment, do I have to declare a payroll deduction amount at the same time for future contributions?

    No, you can select the Health Savings Account option but enter a zero amount. If you later decide that you would like to contribute to your Health Savings Account via payroll deductions, you can modify your HSA contribution amount at any time in Oracle under LANL Worker Self Service.

    Remember – you must establish an HSA account through HSA Bank to receive any LANL contributions even if you do not wish to contribute to the HSA.

  4. Can I transfer funds from an Individual Retirement Account to a Health Savings Account?

    Yes, but IRA funds only can be transferred once in a lifetime to a Health Savings Account without penalty and cannot exceed the calendar year limit. Contact HSA Bank with any questions.

  5. If I enroll my spouse under my High-Deductible Health Plan, can I pay for her or his medical expenses out of my Health Savings Account?

    Yes, as long as you were married either at the time your spouse received the medical services or at the time you paid the medical expenses.

  6. If I enroll my dependent children under my High-Deductible Health Plan, can I pay for their medical expenses out of my Health Savings Account even though the children are not claimed as dependents on my tax return?

    No, you cannot pay for the children’s medical expenses out of your Health Savings Account if they are not claimed as your tax dependents. However, if the children are of sufficient age they could open their own Health Savings Accounts since they are enrolled in a High-Deductible Health Plan.

  7. If I enroll in the HSA option for 2018 but had a HCRA in 2017, how does the HCRA grace period affect my eligibility to contribute to an HSA?

    If you are currently in a Health Care Reimbursement Account (HCRA) and enroll in the 2018 High-Deductible Health Plan (HDHP) with the option Health Savings Account (HSA) during Open Enrollment, keep in mind that you need to spend and be fully reimbursed for any remaining 2017 HCRA balance by December 31, 2017 in order to qualify to begin contributions into a Health Savings Account (HSA) in January 2018. If your HCRA account contains a balance on December 31, 2017, you will not be able to contribute to an HSA until April 1, 2018 (after the HCRA grace period).

  8. What happens to my Health Savings Account if I change to a different employer?

    If your new employer offers a High-Deductible Health Plan (HDHP), you will be able to continue contributing to your existing Health Savings Account (HSA).

    If your new employer does not offer a High-Deductible Health Plan, you can no longer contribute to your HSA but you can still spend your available funds on qualified medical expenses.

  9. What happens to my Health Savings Account if I die?

    In the event of your death, the funds in your Health Savings Account will be paid out to your designated beneficiary. If no beneficiary has been designated, the funds will go to your estate.

  10. What happens to my Health Savings Account when I retire?

The Health Savings Account (HSA) will continue to be yours into retirement; however, once you are retired you will no longer be able to contribute unless you are enrolled in a qualified high deductible health plan. You can still spend your available funds on qualified medical expenses, including to pay for Medicare premiums. At age 65, you can use the account for non-medical spending, but you will have to pay tax for any non-medical withdrawals.

  • If I was enrolled in a Health Savings Account (HSA) in 2017 and continue my enrollment in an HSA, will I receive a new card in 2018?

    No, your current HSA Bank card will continue to work in 2018.

  • How do I avoid the HSA Bank fees associated with my Health Savings Account?

    Refer to the HSA Bank Account Fee schedule (pdf) to learn how to avoid commonly charged fees.

  • Can my LANL spouse and I both enroll in an individual Health Savings Account?

    If each employee meets the eligibility criteria to own a Health Savings Account, both employees can enroll in the HDHP with the HSA option; however, between the both of them they cannot contribute more than the family maximum for a given tax year.

  • If my spouse and I both have individual Health Savings Accounts can we roll them into one at a later date?

    No, each Health Savings Account is an individually owned account reported to the IRS by an individual social security number so you will not be able to consolidate at a later date.

  • If my Health Savings Account was frozen until April 1, 2017 due to a balance in my Health Care Reimbursement Account, can I still contribute up to the IRS maximum?

    To be eligible to contribute the entire 2017 annual maximum, you must stay eligible for the account through the end of the 2018 calendar year. If the accountholder does not plan to remain covered through the end of 2018, they can only fund nine-twelfth of the IRS annual maximum for 2017. For specific questions, please contact HSA Bank directly.

  • What contributions apply toward the IRS annual maximum for my Health Savings Account?

    Contributions from all sources, including contributions made by LANL, apply toward the IRS annual maximum. Any contributions above the IRS limits will need to be removed to avoid potential tax consequences. For specific questions, please contact HSA Bank directly.

Health Care Reimbursement Account (HCRA)
  1. I’m currently enrolled in a Health Care Reimbursement Account. If I select the 2018 Preferred Provider Organization Plan during Open Enrollment, will I be automatically enrolled in the Health Care Reimbursement Account for next year?

    No. Enrollment in a Health Care Reimbursement Account (HCRA) does not automatically carry over from year to year. You must make an active election (enroll or re-enroll) during Open Enrollment to have coverage the following year.

  2. If I currently have a HCRA and am considering enrolling in the HSA for 2018, what do I have to be aware of?

    If you are currently enrolled in a Health Care Reimbursement Account (HCRA) and enroll in the 2018 High-Deductible Health Plan (HDHP) with the optional Health Savings Account (HSA) during Open Enrollment, keep in mind that you will need to spend and be fully reimbursed for any remaining 2017 HCRA balance by December 31, 2017 in order to qualify to begin contributions into a Health Savings Account (HSA) in January 2018. If your HCRA account contains a balance on December 31, 2017, you will not be able to contribute to an HSA until April 1, 2018 (after the HCRA grace period).

  3. Do I have to enroll in the PPO plan to have access to the HCRA?

    No. You can have a Health Care Reimbursement Account (HCRA) if you are enrolled in the PPO plan or if you choose to waive all medical coverage; a HCRA cannot be paired with the HDHP plan.

High-Deductible Health Plan (HDHP)
  1. Can I have other medical insurance in addition to the High-Deductible Health Plan?

    Yes, the High-Deductible Health Plan (HDHP) does not have to be your only medical insurance; however, you cannot have other medical coverage if you would like to take advantage of a Health Savings Account (HSA).

  2. What expenses count toward meeting the deductible under the High-Deductible Health Plan?

    With the exception of preventive care, all covered medical and prescription charges go towards meeting the deductible on the HDHP plan.

  3. How is the family annual deductible reached under the High-Deductible Health Plan?

    On the HDHP plan there is no single deductible when the member is covered as a family. Before the plan will start paying coinsurance a covered family must meet the entire family deductible of $3,000. Please see below for two examples of how a family could meet the family deductible:

    • Family 1 - This is an employee and spouse. On January 17th the spouse goes in for outpatient surgery. His surgery accumulates $3,000 toward the family deductible and at that point he and his spouse have met the family deductible for the rest of the year.
    • Family 2 - This family is a husband and wife with 3 kids. On April 2nd one of the kids has a MRI that costs $2,000 that accumulates toward the deductible. In May the employee and spouse each have diagnostic office visits that accumulate $200 per visit toward the deductible. At this point the family has accumulated $2,400 toward the family deductible. As a result of the office visit the employee is prescribed a medication that costs $150. The family has now accumulated $2,550 toward their deductible. In June they have to take one of the kids to the ER. As a result of the ER visit an additional $450 is accumulated toward the family deductible. At this point they have met the family deductible for the year.
  4. How is the family annual out-of-pocket limit reached under the High-Deductible Health Plan?

    On the HDHP plan there is no individual out-of-pocket maximum when the member is covered as a family. Before the plan will pay 100% a covered family must meet the entire family out-of-pocket maximum of $6,000. The out-of-pocket maximum can be met by one person in a family or by a combination of accumulated charges among the covered family members.

  5. What happens when I reach my out-of-pocket maximum?

    Once you reach this limit, the plan begins to pay 100% of the allowed amount for covered expenses.

  6. What are preventive services?

    Preventive services include annual physical exams, gynecological exams, immunizations, and routine cholesterol monitoring, mammograms, EKGs, and colonoscopies and are covered in full under both the High-Deductible Health Plan and Preferred Provider Organization Plan.

    When receiving preventive services, it’s best to not pay anything up front at the doctor’s office and to make sure that your doctor codes the preventive services visit correctly.

  7. Will LANL offer an incentive for participation in the HDHP medical plan?

    Yes, LANL will provide an incentive in 2018 for enrolling in the HDHP. If you enroll in the HDHP with the optional HSA, LANL will contribute $250 for individual coverage or $500 if you cover at least one dependent.

Preferred Provider Organization (PPO)
  1. What expenses count toward meeting the deductible under the Preferred Provider Organization Plan?

    Covered medical services on the PPO plan go toward satisfying the medical deductible. Not all services are subject to deductible, so members will only be responsible for satisfying the deductible when accessing services that are subject to deductible. This includes services such as inpatient hospital charges, outpatient surgery, labs and x-rays. This is not a complete list of items subject to the deductible. For a more detailed list please refer to the summary of benefits. Services with a copay and preventive care do not count toward the medical deductible. The out-of-pocket maximum is satisfied by member's cost sharing for covered medical and prescription charges. The out-of-pocket maximum is satisfied when the sum of the member's incurred deductible, copays and coinsurance for covered medical and prescription services reaches the out-of-pocket maximum listed on the summary of benefits.

  2. What is the wellness Health Care Account that is associated with the PPO and how does it work?

    If you participated in the Virgin Pulse Wellness Program (pdf) in 2017, your incentives will be deposited in a Health Care Account with BCBS, which can be used for both medical and prescription drug co-pays, co-insurance and deductibles for any covered family member.

  3. How is the family annual deductible reached under the Preferred Provider Organization Plan?

    For In Network Services the PPO Plan has a $300 deductible per individual that is capped at $900 for a family. Each individual on the PPO plan accumulates charges toward their individual deductible until they satisfy $300. Each individual's accumulated deductible also counts toward the family deductible of $900. Once an individual reaches $300, they stop accumulating toward their individual deductible as well as the family deductible. The family deductible is met when the sum of all individual accumulated deductibles reaches $900. Keep in mind once an individual reaches $300 they are no longer accumulating toward the family deductible. Once the family deductible is met, all members stop accumulating deductibles. Please see below for an example of two ways a family could meet the family deductible:

    • Family 1 - The employee has outpatient surgery on January 2nd. $300 is accumulated toward the employee's individual deductible as well as the family deductible. On February 1st the spouse goes in for a MRI and $300 is accumulated toward her individual deductible as well as the family deductible. At this point $600 has accumulated toward the family deductible. On February 15th the spouse has outpatient surgery; she has already satisfied her deductible so her claim is subject to 10% coinsurance, so no charges are accumulating toward the family deductible. On March 20th the couple's son injures his leg playing soccer and has a MRI. The son accumulates $300 toward his deductible as well as the family deductible. At this point the entire family has met the family deductible and they will no longer be subject to deductible for the remainder of the year.
    • Family 2 - This family has 6 members and they all go in for diagnostic lab work on March 3rd. The lab work costs $150 and each member accumulates $150 toward their individual deductible as well as the family deductible. At this point they would have met the family deductible since $150 X 6 = $900. They will not be subject to deductible for the remainder of the year, even though no one has met their individual deductible.
  4. How is the family annual out-of-pocket limit reached under the Preferred Provider Organization Plan?

    For In Network Services the PPO Plan has a $,3000 out-of-pocket maximum per individual that is capped at $9,000 for a family. Each individual on the PPO plan accumulates charges toward their individual out of pocket maximum until they satisfy $3,000. Each individual's accumulated out-of-pocket maximum also counts toward the family out-of-pocket maximum of $9,000. Once an individual reaches $3,000, they stop accumulating toward their individual out-of-pocket maximum as well as the family out-of-pocket maximum. The family out-of-pocket maximum is met when the sum of all individual accumulated out-of-pocket maximums reaches $9,000. Keep in mind once an individual reaches $3,000 they are no longer accumulating towards the family out-of-pocket maximum. Once the family out-of- pocket maximum is met, all members stop accumulating charges.

Legal
  1. If I enroll in the legal plan, do the ID Theft Protection services start automatically for 2018?

    No, you must log into your ARAG account to activate.


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